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Description

Here is a simple example of how you can use the primitives provided by Carboxyl. First of all, events can be sent into a sink. From a sink one can create a stream of events. Streams can also be filtered, mapped and merged. A signal is an abstraction of a value that may change over time. One can e.g. hold the last event from a stream in a signal.

Programming language: Rust
License: Mozilla Public License 2.0
Tags: Functioanal     Reactive     Event Driven     Asynchronous     Frp     Concurrency     Event    
Latest version: v0.2.1

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README

Build Status

Carboxyl is a library for functional reactive programming in Rust, a functional and composable approach to handle events in interactive applications. Read more in the docs…

Usage example

Here is a simple example of how you can use the primitives provided by Carboxyl. First of all, events can be sent into a sink. From a sink one can create a stream of events. Streams can also be filtered, mapped and merged. A signal is an abstraction of a value that may change over time. One can e.g. hold the last event from a stream in a signal.

extern crate carboxyl;

fn main() {
    let sink = carboxyl::Sink::new();
    let stream = sink.stream();
    let signal = stream.hold(3);

    // The current value of the signal is initially 3
    assert_eq!(signal.sample(), 3);

    // When we fire an event, the signal get updated accordingly
    sink.send(5);
    assert_eq!(signal.sample(), 5);
}

One can also directly iterate over the stream instead of holding it in a signal:

extern crate carboxyl;

fn main() {
    let sink = carboxyl::Sink::new();
    let stream = sink.stream();

    let mut events = stream.events();
    sink.send(4);
    assert_eq!(events.next(), Some(4));
}

Streams and signals can be combined using various primitives. We can map a stream to another stream using a function:

extern crate carboxyl;

fn main() {
    let sink = carboxyl::Sink::new();
    let stream = sink.stream();

    let squares = stream.map(|x| x * x).hold(0);
    sink.send(4);
    assert_eq!(squares.sample(), 16);
}

Or we can filter a stream to create a new one that only contains events that satisfy a certain predicate:

extern crate carboxyl;

fn main() {
    let sink = carboxyl::Sink::new();
    let stream = sink.stream();

    let negatives = stream.filter(|&x| x < 0).hold(0);

    // This won't arrive at the signal.
    sink.send(4);
    assert_eq!(negatives.sample(), 0);

    // But this will!
    sink.send(-3);
    assert_eq!(negatives.sample(), -3);
}

There are a couple of other primitives to compose streams and signals:

  • merge two streams of events of the same type.
  • Make a snapshot of a signal, whenever a stream fires an event.
  • lift! an ordinary function to a function on signals.
  • switch between different signals using a signal containing a signal.

See the documentation for details.

License

Copyright 2014-2020 Carboxyl contributors.

This Source Code Form is subject to the terms of the Mozilla Public License, v. 2.0. If a copy of the MPL was not distributed with this file, You can obtain one at http://mozilla.org/MPL/2.0/.


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the carboxyl README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.