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Description

Rulinalg is a linear algebra library designed with high dimensional computation in mind.

This library was initially a part of rusty-machine but is now a standalone crate.

Monthly Downloads: 344
Programming language: Rust
License: MIT License
Tags: Computation     Linear Algebra     Maths     Matrix     Linear     Algebra     Linalg    
Latest version: v0.4.2

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README

rulinalg

Join the chat at https://gitter.im/rulinalg/Lobby Build Status

The crate is currently on version 0.4.2.

Read the API Documentation to learn more.


Summary

Rulinalg is a linear algebra library written in Rust that doesn't require heavy external dependencies.

The goal of rulinalg is to provide efficient implementations of common linear algebra techniques in Rust.

Rulinalg was initially a part of rusty-machine, a machine learning library in Rust.

Contributing

This project is currently [looking for contributors](CONTRIBUTING.md) of all capacities!


Implementation

This project is implemented using Rust.

Currently the library does not make use of any external dependencies - though hopefully we will have BLAS/LAPACK bindings soon.


Usage

The library usage is described well in the API documentation - including example code.

Installation

The library is most easily used with cargo. Simply include the following in your Cargo.toml file:

[dependencies]
rulinalg="0.4.2"

And then import the library using:

#[macro_use]
extern crate rulinalg;

Then import the modules and you're done!

use rulinalg::matrix::Matrix;

// Create a 2x2 matrix:
let a = Matrix::new(2, 2, vec![
    1.0, 2.0,
    3.0, 4.0,
]);

// Create a 2x3 matrix:
let b = Matrix::new(2, 3, vec![
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0,
    4.0, 5.0, 6.0,
]);

let c = &a * &b; // Matrix product of a and b

// Construct the product of `a` and `b` using the `matrix!` macro:
let expected = matrix![9.0, 12.0, 15.0;
                       19.0, 26.0, 33.0];

// Test for equality:
assert_matrix_eq!(c, expected);

More detailed coverage can be found in the API documentation.